On Art & Heart / Eva Morisawa

On Art & Heart—Eva Morisawa (A series of conversations edited by Rhonda.H.Y.Mason)
On Art & Heart—Eva Morisawa (A series of conversations edited by Rhonda.H.Y.Mason)
On Art & Heart—Eva Morisawa (A series of conversations edited by Rhonda.H.Y.Mason)
On Art & Heart—Eva Morisawa (A series of conversations edited by Rhonda.H.Y.Mason)
On Art & Heart—Eva Morisawa (A series of conversations edited by Rhonda.H.Y.Mason)

Describe the scene before you right now.

I’m sitting on what was supposed to be my ‘favourite chair’ in our living room. The chair is a Hospice Shop find. It is now officially everybody’s favourite chair, including my cat and dog. We live in a small house in a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. I’m looking out the window and mentally planning and bracing myself for some gardening. Spring is just around the corner.

Describe a moment from today that you want to remember

My daughter has missed a few days of school because of a nasty cold. We’ve been cooped up at home all this time. She is getting better and today I told her that she’s been invited to a dinner with her best friend and her family before they go away for holidays. Another invitation also came through for lunch on Sunday. Her face lit up with such joy! It was so wonderful to see her smile and get excited.

What fills you with joy?

My daughter. Seeing her grow up, change, become. Catching up with my family. Kindness. When I get to be kind and when someone is kind to me. Creating and being in a creative environment. People getting together for a good cause. Music. Working out. My Kyudo practice. Walks with my dog and cuddles with my cat. Good books. Looking after my house plants.

I love this question. It’s such a great reminder of how wonderful life is. Not too bad of a list for someone who gets anxiety–triggered depression!

What fills you with hope?

My heart fills up with hope usually from small everyday things. A beautiful sunny day, a stranger’s smile, an act of kindness...

What makes your heart ache?

Cruelty and any type of discrimination. Being so far away from my parents and sister—they live in Poland where I come from.

Describe a piece of art that is precious to you.

I have quite a few original artworks. I love them all. I always say that having an original artwork is like having a magical object in your home. Also, when my mum was selling my grandparents’ house I rescued my grandmother’s cookbook. My mum kept the pages that were in a salvageable condition, and I took the front and back covers. I framed them, and they hang in my kitchen now. The book dates from 1963, and it has always been in my grandmother’s kitchen. It has a special place in my heart.

Are there any books about art that you have found helpful?

I read so many of them and all of them had been helpful in some ways. I don’t have any that stood out in particular.

Can you name a few artists that inspire you?

Inspiration is everywhere. Beginning with cave paintings and ancient Egyptian art through to the Renaissance to modern art. To name a few whom I admire (mainly for revolutionising the very definition of art but also for the amazing art itself): Marcel Duchamp, Yayoi Kusama, Helen Frankenthaler, and Louise Bourgeois.

Is your art driven by heartache or hope or both?

Definitely by both. I am inspired by human emotions.

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You can follow Eva on Instagram here, and you can read the other posts in this series here.